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Professional Summary
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Teaching and Advising

COURSES TAUGHT

*Note: semesters indicated in brackets, such as [F05], provide links to student evaluation data for the course and my analysis of and commentary on those evaluations.

GRADUATE

North Carolina State University:

  • ENG 624: Teaching College Writing [F07] [F08]
  • ENG 583: Writing Across Contexts: New Perspectives [S03]
  • ENG 583: Writing Program Administration: Theory, Practice, and Research (co-taught with Susan Miller-Cochran)* [S11] [S14] [S16]
  • ENG 511 Theory and Research in Composition [S01] [S02] [F03] [F04] [F05] [S06] [S10] [F11] [S13]
  • ENG 583B: Studies in Writing Across the Curriculum [F99]
  • CRD 809: Colloquium in Communication, Rhetoric, and Digital Media [F05]
  • CRD 704: Technology and Pedagogy in the Communication Arts [F05] [F10] [F12] [F16]

*Created course; approval by NC State University as permanent offering pending, 2016.

University of Minnesota:

  • Eng. 8810: Composition and Literacy: Contemporary Issues
  • Eng. 8810: Studies of Writing Across the Curriculum[
  • Eng. 8810: Responding to Student Writing: Theory, Research, Practice
  • Eng. 8810: Advanced Composition Research
  • Eng. 8810: Introduction to Composition Research
  • Eng. 8050: Introduction to Theory and Research in Composition
  • LS8801: Final Project Course, Liberal Studies Master's Program
  • Eng. 5860: Methods of Text Analysis
  • Eng. 8050: Teaching Writing in the College Years: Theory and Research
  • Eng. W5210: Using Writing Creatively in Teaching [1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, & 1999 Summer Institute for Teachers]
  • Eng. W5210: Developing a Teaching Portfolio [1997 Summer Institute Short Course]
  • Eng. W5210: Writing for Teaching [1993 Summer Institute for Teachers]
  • Eng. 5100: Introduction to Composition Theory and Research
  • Eng. 5100: Writing Across the Disciplines
  • Hum 5910: Theories of Reading and Interpretation

UNDERGRADUATE

North Carolina State University (1999-pres.)

  • ENG 491h: World English(es) [honors] [F09]
  • ENG 422: Writing Theory and the Writing Process [S17]
  • ENG 455: Literacy in the U.S.* [S07] [S08] [S09] [S10] [S11] [S12] [F13] [S14] [F15] [F16]
  • ENG 323: Writing in the Rhetorical Tradition [S04]
  • ENG 210: Introduction to Language and Linguistics [S00] [F00] [F01] [S05]
  • ENG 350: Internship in Writing and Editing. [F02]

*Created course and received approval by NC State University as a permanent offering in 2006. Includes service learning requirement.

University of Minnesota (1984-99)

  • PMA1050: Premajor Advising Seminar: Faculty Mentor Program for Premajor Freshmen [2-credits; invited; 1997 and 1998]
  • SPAN 1995: Faculty Advisor for Student Project for Amity Among Nations, Switzerland Group: 1994 advising; summer 1995 advising in residence (Switzerland); 1995-96 project advising. See student entries under "undergraduate directed study." [Competitively chosen]
  • FSSP 5960: SPAN preparation and thesis course (see above); 12 credits.
  • HSem 3010: American Literacy and Cultural Diversity [honors; included service-learning component]
  • HSem 3060: American Literacy and Cultural Diversity [honors; included service-learning component]
  • Eng. 3960: American Literacy and Cultural Diversity [senior seminar; included service learning component]
  • Eng. 3960: English in America [senior seminar]
  • Eng. 3860: English in America
  • Eng. 3860: American Literacy and Cultural Diversity [included service learning component]
  • Eng. 3910: A Survey of Modern Grammars [honors course]
  • Eng. 3860: American Literacy and Cultural Diversity [service-learning course, federally funded]
  • Eng. 3860: Special Topics in English Language: Child Language Development
  • Eng. 3854: American Literacy and Cultural Diversity [included service-learning component]
  • Eng. 3851: Introduction to the English Language
  • Eng. 3852: Aspects of the English Language
  • Eng. 1101: Introduction to Fiction Writing
  • Eng. 1018: Introduction to Modern Fiction
  • Eng. 1016: Introduction to American Literature
  • HCol 1101: Language in America [Summer High School Honors Program, 1992]
  • HCol 1101: Language and Literacy in America [Summer High School Honors Program, 1991]
  • HCol 1101: A Critique of American English [Summer High School Honors Program, 1990]
  • Comp. 3085: Writing the Large Academic Paper
  • Comp. 3065: Editorial Practice
  • Comp 3050: Special Topics in Advanced Composition: Writing in the Metro Internship Program
  • Comp. 3033: Writing in the Health Sciences
  • Comp 3027: Advanced Expository Writing
  • Comp. 3027: Writing About Social Psychology [linked to Psych. 3080]
  • Comp. 3027: Writing About the English Language [linked to Eng. 3851
  • Comp. 3011: Writing About Literature
  • Comp. 1027: Intermediate Expository Writing
  • Comp. 1011: Introductory Expository Writing

Indiana University (1979-1984):

  • Elementary Composition Elementary Composition (Basic Skills)
  • Elementary Composition (Foreign Students)
  • Introduction to Composition (Groups Special Services)
  • Professional Writing
  • Professional Writing for Business Majors
  • Introduction to Literature and Composition
  • Experimental Pilot Course in Reading/Writing Relationships

Syracuse University (1977-79):

  • Introduction to Composition
  • Minicourses in Writing About Literature

 

ADVISING

M.A. AND PH.D. THESES

North Carolina State University (1999-pres.)

University of Minnesota (1984-99)

  • Gill Creel, "How Cozening a Word is this 'Community'": Community College Teachers and Democratic Pedagogy: An Ethnographic Inquiry. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1999. Vol. 60-08A of Dissertation Abstracts International. PAGE 2902
  • Angela Karstadt, Swedish-American English: A Longitudinal Study of Linguistic Variation and Identity. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1999.
  • Louise Gaylord McDonald, Powerful English for the Active and Productive Man: How College English Became Difficult Enough to Build Character at Harvard College, 1890-1900. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1999. [advisor and dissertation director]
  • Carol Ann Rutz, What Does my Teacher Want Me to Do? A Response-Based Investigation of the Teacher-Student Relationship in the Writing Classroom. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English,1999. [advisor and dissertation director]
  • Thomas Joseph Reynolds, Ideological Affinities of Compositional and Popular Literacy: 1880-1920. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1999. [advisor and dissertation director]
  • Michael Kuhne, A Community Pedagogy of Critical Hope: Paulo Freire, Liberation Pedagogy and Liberation Theology. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English,1998.
  • Anna Marie Fellegy, Here/There, These/Those, This/That: Locative Discourse Markers in New Ulm English. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English,1997.
  • Paul Johnson, Literacy, Technology, and Progress: The Social Construction of World-Wide Web Hypertexts in First-Year Composition. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1997.
  • Kim Donehower, Beliefs About Literary in a Southern Appalacian Community. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1997. [advisor and dissertation director]
  • Laurie Lee Forsberg, Studies in Discourse Literacy. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1996.
  • Judith Landrum, The Teaching of Writing in Minnesota High Schools: Suburban, Private, and Urban. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction, 1996.
  • Linda Adler-Kassner, High School History Textbooks and Public Literacy in the Progressive Era: "Reading Progress." Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of Journalism and Mass Communications, 1996.
  • Todd Finley, Post-Baccalaureate Pre-Service English Teachers' Narratives, Stances, Roles, and Practice. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of Curriculum & Instruction, 1995.
  • Judy Lou Beckman, The Relationship Between Reluctant Readers' Need for Social Acceptance and Academic Success and Their Attitude Towards Leisure Reading. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of Curriculum & Instruction, 1994.
  • Bruce Maylath, Words Make a Difference: Effects of Greco-Latinate and Anglo-Saxon Lexical Variation on Post-Secondary-Level Writing Assessment in English. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1994. [Dissertation Director]
  • Joseph Moses, Discourse and Community: Rhetoric and Relationship at a Social Service Agency. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1993.
  • Paul Prior, Contextualizing Writing and Response in Graduate Seminars: A Sociohistoric Perspective on Academic Literacies. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of Curriculum & Instruction, 1993.
  • Mary Ann Bock, Education With the People: "Race," Pedagogy and Literacy. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1993.
  • Karen Joy Muslof, The Angel Sings: The First Rhetorical Quest of Nancy, Lady Astor, November, 1919. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of Speech Communications, 1992.
  • Jeanette M. Lindholm, Bearing Witness to the Word: Language, Faith, and Learning in an Evangelical College Community. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1992.
  • Marion Larson, Writers in Transition: Case Studies of Undergraduate Interns. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1992.
  • Julienne S. Prineas, The Indigenous Writer: A Study of Nonfluent Writers Among Capable Upper-Division College Students. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1991.
  • Mark Christensen, Interpersonal Cognitive Complexity and Abstractness, Degree of Self-Disclosure, and Solidarity with Addressee as Factors in the Quality of College Students' Autobiographical Writing, Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of Curriculum & Instruction, 1990.
  • Joanne Cavallaro, The Effects of Selected Test Features on Teachers' Judgments of Students' Writing, Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of Curriculum & Instruction, 1990.
  • Hildy Miller, Thesis-Design for Writing: Image and Metaphor in the Cognitive Processes of Composing, Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1990.
  • Katharine Swanson, The Relationship of Interpersonal Cognitive Complexity and Message-Design Logics Employed in Response to a Regulative Writing Task, Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of Curriculum & Instruction, 1990.
  • Linda Fine Wendler, The Effects of Biblical Prior Knowledge and Verbal Ability on College Students' Ability to Interpret Short Stories. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction, 1989.
  • Anne O'Meara, Representing Emily Dickinson: A Study of Literary Practice. Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1988.
  • Bette Baldwin, Trends in Linguistic Politics: The English-Only Movement, Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1987.
  • Laura Brady, Collaborative Literary Writing: Issues of Authorship and Authority, Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1988.
  • Jill Reilly, The Effects of Guided Prewriting on Eighth Graders, Eleventh Graders, College Freshmen and College Juniors on Interpretation of a Story, M.A. Thesis, Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction, 1985.
  • Deborah Appleman, The Effect of Heuristically Based Assignments on Adolescent Response to Literature, Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction, 1986.
  • Geoffrey Sirc, Composing Processes in Writing: A Critical Review of Paradigms in Theory and Research, Ph.D. Dissertation, Dept. of English, 1985.

M.A. AND Ph.D. PRELIMINARY EXAMINING COMMITTEES [reader on all written examination committees unless otherwise indicated]

  • Over 50 committees; list available on request.

M.A. AND MAJOR GRADUATE DEGREE PAPERS (ADVISOR)

  • 11 papers; list available on request.

GRADUATE DIRECTED STUDIES

  • 42 courses, 148 total academic credits; list available on request.

UNDERGRADUATE HONORS AND SUMMA THESES, SENIOR PROJECTS, DIRECTED STUDIES

  • 64 students; list available on requests.

Thank a Teacher Program: I recently received a letter from the Provost as part of a "thank a teacher" program at NC State, which conveyed to me some comments of a student who had taken one of my courses. This student's words were among the kindest I've ever received, and are truly what makes working in this profession so fulfilling. I've included them here:

"Dr. Anson, I am grateful that I had the opportunity to take one of your classes. You are one of the very rare and truly great people who are involved in higher education. Thank you for being an example of how every professor should conduct a classroom. Thank you for showing me that you can be both creative and theoretical in your approach to writing. Your dedication to both the field and your students is simply astounding. In all my years in academia I have yet to meet a professor who is as energetic, inspiring and devoted as you. Your genuine interest in the course material as well as the time and thoughtfulness you give to student assessment is something I have, sadly, never encountered elsewhere. Thank you for making my graduate studies at NC State something I can look back on years from now, fondly. You are appreciated so much."







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